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Paddling, done correctly, can be as fun as surfing

Paddling is the key that opens the door to all surfing. The foundation of surfing is paddling, an ancient and primitive art that dates back centuries upon centuries. One of, if not the, first effective means of transportation is paddling. People were traveling by paddling well before horseback riding. Early men that paddled held great superiority over those that did not in many ways. Paddling is good for the body, mind and soul.

Somewhere way back some intelligent and brave person decided to grab a log, hop on it and paddle directly across a body of water. Immediately, this person expanded mankind’s capability for travel unlike anything ever seen before. Early man’s world just got larger.

There are no “surflifts” in surfing or easy ways to get to the waves. Anyone who has experience paddling out through the waves or great distances can tell you paddling can be a great deal of work. Anyone that mistakenly believes surfers do not work has never paddled a surfboard. Surfers earn their rides the hard way, by using one arm over the other, over and over.

Paddling in surfing is everything. A surfer must be positioned on the board perfectly if he is to stand on the surfboard in the perfect place. If a surfer is even slightly off-center, the surfboard will become off-balanced. In addition to proper position, surfers must develop proper posture. Surfers with proper posture paddle with their feet together, back arched, chest and head raised and eyes held level. The surfboard and surfer become one.

Not only is positioning important for a surfer’s posture and form, it is also important relative to a surfer’s position and timing among the ocean currents and waves. Catching and riding waves requires surfers to develop keen paddling awareness of space and time. A surfer that paddles just half a second too fast or slow, one foot too far in advance or behind, will suffer the consequences of being out of position relative to the wave. Catching a wave successfully demands surfers paddle with precise positioning and timing.

Though paddling does take effort, it is sustained by rhythm and flow. Strength in paddling comes more from rhythm and flow than physical muscles. Paddlers that rely on muscles alone will quickly run out of steam and get tired. Paddlers using muscles, rhythm and flow can go for miles and miles with out ever stopping. The secret is to get the surfboard moving and then use miniPaddling is the key that opens the door to all surfing. The foundation of surfing is paddling, an ancient and primitive art that dates back centuries upon centuries. One of, if not the, first effective means of transportation is paddling. People were traveling by paddling well before horseback riding. Early men that paddled held great superiority over those that did not in many ways. Paddling is good for the body, mind and soul.

Somewhere way back some intelligent and brave person decided to grab a log, hop on it and paddle directly across a body of water. Immediately, this person expanded mankind’s capability for travel unlike anything ever seen before. Early man’s world just got larger.

There are no “surflifts” in surfing or easy ways to get to the waves. Anyone who has experience paddling out through the waves or great distances can tell you paddling can be a great deal of work. Anyone that mistakenly believes surfers do not work has never paddled a surfboard. Surfers earn their rides the hard way, by using one arm over the other, over and over.

Paddling in surfing is everything. A surfer must be positioned on the board perfectly if he is to stand on the surfboard in the perfect place. If a surfer is even slightly off-center, the surfboard will become off-balanced. In addition to proper position, surfers must develop proper posture. Surfers with proper posture paddle with their feet together, back arched, chest and head raised and eyes held level. The surfboard and surfer become one.

Not only is positioning important for a surfer’s posture and form, it is also important relative to a surfer’s position and timing among the ocean currents and waves. Catching and riding waves requires surfers to develop keen paddling awareness of space and time. A surfer that paddles just half a second too fast or slow, one foot too far in advance or behind, will suffer the consequences of being out of position relative to the wave. Catching a wave successfully demands surfers paddle with precise positioning and timing.

Though paddling does take effort, it is sustained by rhythm and flow. Strength in paddling comes more from rhythm and flow than physical muscles. Paddlers that rely on muscles alone will quickly run out of steam and get tired. Paddlers using muscles, rhythm and flow can go for miles and miles with out ever stopping. The secret is to get the surfboard moving and then use minidling is the key that opens the door to all surfing. The foundation of surfing is paddling, an ancient and primitive art that dates back centuries upon centuries. One of, if not the, first effective means of transportation is paddling. People were traveling by paddling well before horseback riding. Early men that paddled held great superiority over those that did not in many ways. Paddling is good for the body, mind and soul.

Somewhere way back some intelligent and brave person decided to grab a log, hop on it and paddle directly across a body of water. Immediately, this person expanded mankind’s capability for travel unlike anything ever seen before. Early man’s world just got larger.

There are no “surflifts” in surfing or easy ways to get to the waves. Anyone who has experience paddling out through the waves or great distances can tell you paddling can be a great deal of work. Anyone that mistakenly be