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‘Other’ candidates share reasons for run

The “other” three candidates in the mayor’s race - Eric Bidwell, James B. Hart and Floyd L. Morrow - have neither the money nor the notoriety of the two higher-profile candidates in the race, incumbent mayor Jerry Sanders and businessman Steve Francis.

But what the three lesser-known challengers for the city’s top political post do have is a fresh outlook and an alternative “take” on the issues, which they hope will compel citizens to vote for them, or at least become more involved in the political process.

An ardent environmentalist, Clairemont resident James B. Hart, who’s never held a political office, said he’s joined the mayoral race because he wants to advance a few ideas he has about what the problems of San Diego - and indeed the world - really are and what can be done about them.

“My greatest focus is to see a regional population limitation put into effect quickly,” noted Hart, who added he feels overpopulation is one of the worst, and growing, problems facing all of humanity and one we need to get a handle on if the quality of life of human beings is to be improved.

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“How many human beings can we reasonably sustain in the future?,” asked Hart, asserting that many current problems - water shortages, global warming, the food and energy situation (shortages) - are the result of too many people chasing too-few resources. “We need to set a (population) limit and achieve that,” Hart said.

Another “atypical” politician, Eric Bidwell touts himself as the “revolutionary” mayoral candidate. “The main reason I’m running is to try and make the political process a little more accessible for the general public,” said the youthful, dreadlocked candidate, who runs a T-shirt and button company and is coordinating his political campaign almost exclusively via his Internet Web site. “People are feeling pretty alienated. They don’t have easy access (to politics) or good (political) representation. What I’m doing is trying to show that anybody can get involved: You don’t have to wear a suit.”

On his Web site, Bidwell said he wants to become mayor in order to inspire and engage the public of San Diego to take control of the community through democracy rather than allow control by special-interest lobbies, and to create a city government that is truly representative of all of the big war on the working class continues unabated,” added Morrow. “The reality is, right now, the working person really hasn’t got a fair shot. Working people in San Diego have been debased to the point where they don’t make enough to pay the rent and provide food.”

Concerning the two higher-profile candidates in the mayor’s race, incumbent Sanders and Francis, Morrow said: “One is a police chief converted into being a mayor, and the other is an establishment guy who is trying to buy the office. They’re both been uncivil to each other and everybody else.”

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Candidate Hart has a number of causes he’d like to champion, like switching to a four-day work week. “If we did that,” Hart said, “we could deal not only with the problem of (rising) gasoline costs but also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which are causing global warming, by about 20 percent.”

Hart would also like San Diego to go to zero landfill recycling “right away.”

Hart has yet another simple but completely “doable” idea for preserving natural resources: collecting rainwater. “If people and industries collected rainwater in the winter,” he said, “that could be used during the summer for refrigeration systems. That could be a huge cost savings.”

Bidwell contends that more traditional mayoral candidates like Sanders and Francis have “lost touch” with the common man. “I am categorically different than the rest of the guys (mayoral candidates),” he noted. “They’re in touch with the upper-class demographic. I want to appeal to a demographic that’s broader.”

If it were up to Morrow, he would end U.S. military involvement in Iraq. “We’re spending $2 billion per day with the DOD (Department of Defense),” he said. “We need to realign our priorities to bring the troops home. Eisenhower warned us that the biggest problem we would face in the future is the industrial-military complex. What he predicted is now true.” its citizens.”

“I want to increase the use of public transit, expand bicycle lanes, encourage carpooling and reduce reliance on single-occupant passenger vehicles,” said Bidwell. “I want to build an emergency Web site that will coordinate efforts and be a centralized location to access information to enable our city to respond efficiently to fires, earthquakes or other disasters. I want to work to reduce water consumption, recycle wastewater and build a secure and sustainable water supply.”

Mayoral candidate Floyd L. Morrow said he’s run in 21 elections over the years. He was a councilman in San Diego’s Fifth District for 12 years and was also previously a deputy city attorney.

Morrow said he is pro-peace, anti-war and an affordable housing advocate.

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Morrow has military experience, including a three-year stint in the U.S. Marine Corp. (1951-54) and combat duty in Korea as a platoon sergeant, which he stated, “Comes in handy because I am totally convinced as a peace activist that aggressive war and the use of force only leads to more.”

“The war on terrorism and the big war on the working class continues unabated,” added Morrow. “The reality is, right now, the working person really hasn’t got a fair shot. Working people in San Diego have been debased to the point where they don’t make enough to pay the rent and provide food.”

Concerning the two higher-profile candidates in the mayor’s race, incumbent Sanders and Francis, Morrow said: “One is a police chief converted into being a mayor, and the other is an establishment guy who is trying to buy the office. They’re both been uncivil to each other and everybody else.”

Candidate Hart has a number of causes he’d like to champion, like switching to a four-day work week. “If we did that,” Hart said, “we could deal not only with the problem of (rising) gasoline costs but also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which are causing global warming, by about 20 percent.”

Hart would also like San Diego to go to zero landfill recycling “right away.”

Hart has yet another simple but completely “doable” idea for preserving natural resources: collecting rainwater. “If people and industries collected rainwater in the winter,” he said, “that could be used during the summer for refrigeration systems. That could be a huge cost savings.”

Bidwell contends that more traditional mayoral candidates like Sanders and Francis have “lost touch” with the common man. “I am categorically different than the rest of the guys (mayoral candidates),” he noted. “They’re in touch with the upper-class demographic. I want to appeal to a demographic that’s broader.”

If it were up to Morrow, he would end U.S. military involvement in Iraq. “We’re spending $2 billion per day with the DOD (Department of Defense),” he said. “We need to realign our priorities to bring the troops home. Eisenhower warned us that the biggest problem we would face in the future is the industrial-military complex. What he predicted is now true.”

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