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Bond initiative would upgrade LJ schools

Voters to decide on $2.1 billion plan in November

If the district can get voters to approve a major infusion of cash through a bond initiative, each of La Jolla’s five public schools would see more than a million dollars in improvements.

On July 23, the San Diego Board of Education voted to put the $2.1 billion measure on the Nov. 4 ballot.

If it passes, it would raise more than $273 million for upgrades required under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The rest of the funds would go to other facility and technology upgrades at schools.

In addition to getting funds to bring all schools to the same basic standard, each school would be allotted $150 per student to use on discretionary projects particular to that school.

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Cynthia Reed-Porter, a school district spokesperson, said that these discretionary funds are somewhat flexible, but that in general they must be used for facilities improvement.

“If you can turn the building upside down and it doesn’t fall out, then you can do it,” she said.

High school list

For example, at La Jolla High School, which is slated to receive more than $4 million in upgrades from the bond issue, plans include food kiosks and additional covered exterior dining areas. Other improvements would be made to the student drop-off and pick-up area, renovating locker rooms and the gym as well as renovating or replacing the stadium bleachers and press box.

Among the common items and projects that would be completed at all of La Jolla’s schools are renovation of restrooms, installation of WIFI, general technology upgrades, improved fire alarms and emergency communications, improved parking and drop-off areas, and general clean-up of health hazards.

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for a detailed list.

The bond initiative continues a process begun in the late 1990s when the district did a massive review of school facilities and created a Long Range Facilities Master Plan.

That plan envisioned about $4 billion in improvements to district facilities.

Then, in 1998, voters passed Prop. MM, which authorized $1.51 billion in bonds.

Continuing Prop. MM

This year’s bond initiative is intended to continue the facilities improvements begun with Prop. MM funds.

Reed-Porter said that all schools built since Prop. MM have been built with “smart rooms,” and that the new bond issue would bring the technology for these rooms to all of the district’s schools.

Smart rooms use an array of technologies - computers, large screens, microphones, specialized software - to allow teachers to expand their methods of teaching.

“When you go into the classroom and you watch these teachers instructing with the technology they have in the new schools, it’s amazing,” she said.

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Spending breakdown

Here’s a breakdown on the funds La Jolla schools would receive.
  • Torrey Pines Elementary School, built in 1963 with 398 students, would receive more than $1.7 million.
  • La Jolla Elementary School, built in 1942 with 553 students, would receive more than $1.3 million.
  • Muirlands Middle School, built in 1963 with its 1,078 students, would receive more than $2.7 million.
  • Bird Rock Elementary School, built in 1952, would receive more than $1.13. million, based on 450 students.
  • La Jolla High School, built in 1940 with 1,666 students, would receive nearly $4.2 million.

MORE INFORMATION

Torrey Pines Elementary School, built in 1963 with 398 students, would receive $1,070,417

  • Repair site sidewalks and hardscape areas as needed
  • Repair/replace heating and ventilation systems as needed
  • Repair/replace aging wiring and electrical systems
  • Repair/replace deteriorating plumbing and sewer systems
  • Repair/replace building interiors, exteriors, fixtures and finishes, including doors as needed
  • Repair site fencing and gates
  • Repair/replace roofing as needed
  • Repair/replace/upgrade performance spaces/multipurpose rooms

La Jolla Elementary School, built in 1942 (553 students), would receive $1,300,885

  • Repair/replace/remove old portable classrooms
  • Repair/replace deteriorating plumbing and sewer systems
  • Replace aging wiring and upgrade electrical systems as needed
  • Repair/restore building interiors, exteriors, finishes and fixtures as needed
  • Repair/replace aging door assemblies and hardware where necessary
  • Repair and replace gutters, downspouts, catch-basins and underground piping as needed
  • Resurface asphalt parking lots and playground areas as needed
  • Repair/replace heating and ventilation systems as needed
  • Repair/replace/upgrade performance spaces/multipurpose rooms

Muirlands Middle School, built in 1963 (1078 students), would receive $2,725,934

  • Renovate food service areas to increase service efficiency, provide healthier food choices and improve eating environment
  • Replace aging wiring and upgrade electrical systems, including adding additional receptacles throughout campus
  • Repair/replace buckling sidewalks
  • Repair/restore building interiors, exteriors, finishes and fixtures, including flooring as needed
  • Repair/upgrade inefficient heating and ventilation systems as needed
  • Repair/replace deteriorating plumbing and sewer lines as needed
  • Repair/replace/upgrade performance spaces/multipurpose rooms

Bird Rock Elementary School, built in 1952 (450 students), would receive $1,133,543

  • Repair/replace/remove old portable classrooms
  • Expand restroom capacity to include service at kindergarten classrooms
  • Repair site sidewalks, hardscape , landscape and drainage areas to include asphalt overlay and irrigation repair
  • Repair/replace heating and ventilation systems as needed
  • Repair/replace deteriorating plumbing and sewer systems
  • Repair/replace gutters, downspouts, catch-basins and underground piping as required to improve drainage and ponding for student safety where needed
  • Repair/restore building interiors, exteriors, finishes and fixtures
  • Replace aging wiring and upgrade electrical systems as needed
  • Repair/replace/upgrade performance spaces/multipurpose rooms

La Jolla High School, built in 1940 (1,666 students), would receive $4,189,371

  • Renovate food service area, including cafeteria, to increase service efficiency and provide healthier food choices
  • Provide food kiosks and additional covered exterior dining areas
  • Renovate locker rooms and create additional storage space from underutilized square footage
  • Renovate gym, including new bleachers, to meet accessibility regulations
  • Renovate/replace old stadium bleachers, including press box, storage, and accessible concessions
  • Upgrade fields for safe use and compliance with accessibility regulations
  • Provide new accessible restrooms for stadium and field area
  • Provide accessible weight room/fitness space
  • Repair/replace/upgrade performance spaces

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