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La Jolla Art and Wine Festival will bring crowds to the Village streets

La Jolla Art and Wine Festival (LJAWF), seven years strong, is a festival for the senses. Spanning several blocks in the Village Oct. 10-11, the festival brings more than 150 artists to town to show their finest in various mediums, wine and beer from near and afar, musical and theatrical entertainment, opportunities for children to make art of their own, and mouth-watering aromas from food trucks wafting in the air — all bathed in that beautiful La Jolla sunshine.

Members of Junior Crew entertain with street beats that attract a bigger and bigger crowd during the 2014 La Jolla Art and Wine Festival. Light File
Members of Junior Crew entertain with street beats that attract a bigger and bigger crowd during the 2014 La Jolla Art and Wine Festival. Light File

LJAWF will run 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11 along Girard Avenue between Torrey Pines Road and Prospect Street, with booths on Silverado Street and Wall Street. There is no cost for admission, but proceeds from art and wine sales, as well as the silent auction, benefit underfunded programs at La Jolla Elementary, Bird Rock Elementary, Torrey Pines Elementary and Muirlands Middle schools.

Organizers have canvassed the community for unique silent auction items — including spending a day with La Jolla Light! Almost all the artists donate something to the silent auction, further presenting the potential for a great deal.

A sister event, the BraveCort BrewFest, is set for 8 p.m. Saturday night along Girard Avenue. Now in its second year, proceeds from the beer festival benefit pediatric cancer research.

A family is intrigued by the marine-animals created from glass during the 2014 La Jolla Art and Wine Festival. Light File
A family is intrigued by the marine-animals created from glass during the 2014 La Jolla Art and Wine Festival. Light File

“The La Jolla Art and Wine Festival is a juried fine art show and we look for new and unique artists who haven’t shown before or don’t normally show,” said festival spokesperson Sherry Ahern. “Some art is under a hundred dollars, others range into thousands of dollars, so there is really something for everyone.”

She added, “I founded this event because I wanted to bring art back to La Jolla, which used to be an artist’s colony. This year and in years past, we sold out (artist applications) within 24 hours. Now we have about 200 people on the waiting list. And it isn’t some eeny meeny miney mo (selection process), this is a professional show. The judges at the festival have been handpicked by us from local art institutions.”

La Jolla native cherry Sweig will be showing her paintings for the first time this year. A Bishop’s School graduate, she recently moved back to La Jolla, and wants to present her work as a “reintroduction” to the community.

“I’m a painter and I love to paint anything about La Jolla, such as its beach scenes, village scenes and animals,” she said. “I’m really excited to explore a new concept for my booth.” Unlike a typical artist’s booth, Sweig will recreate her studio at her spot in the festival.

“There won’t be any walls, just some furniture on loan from Ark Antiques to display my art. I just want to make it so that when you walk in, you feel like you are in my studio. I want it to be very warm and inviting,” she said.

Sweig will show her paintings of her beloved beach scenes, but said she is proud of a three-painting installation showing the cove in different stages of her work. “There will be one image that is just pencil sketches, then an image that is partially done, and then the finishing painting,” she said. “I want to show the process and open it up for questions.”

An animal lover, she also said if someone were to bring in a photo of their pet, she would paint its portrait.

returning to LJAWF for the fourth time, Los Angeles-based artist time McClendon will show his mixed-media pieces.

“It’s a great outlet and a great opportunity for creative people and artists, and the people who come are great. A lot of festivals have people just walking around, and they’ll stop by and then leave, but in La Jolla, people appreciate what you do and ask questions. they are knowledgeable about art,” he said.

calling LJAWF the “No. 1 art show in San Diego,” Mcclendon said he was most excited to be showing side-by-side with his wife, Linda.

“She is showing for the first time this year, and we have booths together. this will be our first time showing our work together, so it’s kind of wild,” he said.

Time Mcclendon works in tarnish-resistant wire decorated with Swarovski crystals, with pieces ranging from rings to six-foot tall statues.

“From A-Z, it’s a great show for everyone,” he said.

Fun for all ages

It wouldn’t be an art and wine festival without wine! And because it’s San Diego, there are craft beers to boot. Wines from california and international vintners will be available for purchase, as will beer from local and distant breweries such as La Jolla brewing company, bay city brewing company, Golden coast Mead and 2 towns ciderhouse.

the wine and beer garden opens at noon each day. A ticket for a wine or beer tasting is $4 and a six-pack of tickets is $20.

For visitors a few decades away from drinking age, there is a children’s area, where young artists can make their own art, including painting a donated car, and partake in the festival scavenger hunt, Ahern said.

Having a youth area is deemed ever important, given that local children are the festival beneficiaries. “Over the first six years, we’ve given $525,000 to our elementary and middle schools,” Ahern said. “Those proceeds will have an impact for 4,000 students attending these schools. I get Goosebumps when I think about it.”

BraveCort BrewFest

Back for a second year, the BraveCort BrewFest will kick off 8 p.m. Saturday night in the wine and beer garden, and raise funds for pediatric cancer research. $40 admission grants unlimited samplings from the 12 participating breweries that will bring two different beers each. For the event, URBN St. brewing company will brew a special beer, an Imperial Stout with a whopping 11.1 percent alcohol by volume.

The popular stein-holding contest, or Masskrugstemmen, will also return. Event founder Andrea Dahlberg said last year’s winner held the stein for 16 minutes. This year, spectators may vote for who they think will win for a chance to win a prize.

Last year, the event raised $25,000, Dahlberg said, which was combined with a $100,00 from Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation and given to Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure, and matched for a total of $250,000.

More information: ljawf.com or bravecort.com

La Jolla Art and Wine Fest

■ A benefit for La Jolla public schools

■ 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 (BraveCort BrewFest 8 p.m. Saturday)

■ 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11

■ Where: Girard Avenue between Torrey Pines Road and Prospect Street, on Silverado Street and Wall Street

■ Admission: Free for Festival, $40 for BrewFest

■ Information: ljawf.com