Advertisement
Share

Subdivision plan for two houses on Fay Avenue gets La Jolla DPR approval

A rendering depicts a residential project planned for the 7300 block of Fay Avenue in La Jolla.
(Courtesy of Tim Golba)

A proposal to subdivide a property on Fay Avenue and create two new homes got the La Jolla Development Permit Review Committee’s blessing on its first review during the board’s meeting June 21.

The project calls for coastal development and site development permits for the subdivision, demolition of an existing home and construction of two new single-family residences on separate lots with a detached garage on each lot. The project totals 5,254 square feet at 7310 and 7312 Fay Ave.

Architect Tim Golba said he did a similar project “a block down Fay to the south about two years ago” and that “we are taking this approach because the mechanism of the small-lot subdivision is a better way to go.”

He said each property owner would “have the ability to claim their own space” under that approach.

Golba said the project would not affect any neighboring property owner’s privacy and that “neighbors have been supportive all along. Our client has met with them repeatedly.”

Aesthetically, the intent is for the development to “look like two separate buildings instead of one giant structure,” he said.

DPR trustee Diane Kane applauded the design: “I really like this … it really maintains that neighborhood character. It is just the type of approach we have been looking for on these lots that have 50-foot frontages, where you want to do a lot split.

“You have differentiations of materials … and the nicest alley facade I have ever seen.”

Trustee Mike Costello said he appreciated that the properties “are similar but don’t look like twins. They have their own individual identity. That’s really nice.”

The one question that gave pause was whether older trees on the property would be replaced. One likely would be removed because it is not likely to survive the construction, but the backyard is planned to have “significant shade trees,” Golba said.

Two motions followed — one to make the committee’s preliminary review final and the other to support the project. Both passed unanimously.

After the votes, trustee John Shannon asked whether this approach to small-lot subdivisions is likely be replicated in the future, given that similar projects have been built or proposed in recent years (one of them a development on Nautilus Street that was voted down by the La Jolla Community Planning Association in May).

“Small-lot subdivisions … give you that sense of ownership, which our client and every other real estate agent [believes] is worth a significant amount of money compared to a condo,” Golba said. “I think this bodes well for people in the future. Once it gets out there, [people will see] this is a much better approach because the final product is light-years above a condominium.”

The DPR’s findings proceed to the Community Planning Association for ratification or further review.

The Development Permit Review Committee next meets at 4 p.m. Tuesday, July 12, likely online. Learn more at lajollacpa.org. ◆