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Mystery solved: Creator of ‘Rosemont Trading Post’ on La Jolla Bike Path comes forward

Rozanne Edwards built and maintains the Rosemont Trading Post on the La Jolla Bike Path.
Rozanne Edwards said she built and maintains the Rosemont Trading Post on the La Jolla Bike Path to “share with people that might need something that I have, and vice versa.”
(Courtesy)

A La Jolla woman has come forward as the originator of the “Rosemont Trading Post” following the structure’s mysterious appearance last month on the La Jolla Bike Path. “The mystery is solved,” she said.

Rozanne Edwards, who lives on Rosemont Street behind the trading post’s location just south of the Rosemont entrance, erected the Rosemont Trading post Dec. 15. The wooden kiosk contains a sign encouraging passersby to “give a little, take a little.”

Unlike the chalk messages drawn on the La Jolla Bike Path in recent months, a new, less ephemeral structure has appeared.

The trading post was quickly filled with household items and has garnered “good feedback,” Edwards said.

“I’ve had the idea for a little while,” she said, “and I ended up with the time. I just feel everyone’s got a little bit of something to give, and everyone could use a little something like that.”

The original concept was “to share garden things,” Edwards said, “but the community started bringing all types of things, which I really loved.”

Rozanne Edwards, pictured with her husband, Clinton, created the Rosemont Trading Post.
Rozanne Edwards, pictured with her husband, Clinton, created the Rosemont Trading Post.
(Courtesy)

“Those with the ability to give or that have something to give, especially during this time, have the responsibility to give what they can,” she said. “It’s something that I can give ... and something that can benefit others. I’m happy that other people are enjoying it so far.”

She said she has given items from her garden. “I thought that was a way I could ... share with people that might need something that I have, and vice versa.”

After news of the trading post was published in the La Jolla Light, Edwards said she “had a bunch of people call me and text me and say, ‘Rozy, you’re the mystery!’” Her mother, who lives in Washington state, read the story online and notified her.

“I have some kind of fun plans for the future,” Edwards said of the trading post, such as adding shelving to accommodate the number of books that have been left and placing pages that children can color in that offer information on the native plants along the bike path, many of which Edwards and her husband placed.

“I’m kind of a plant nerd,” she said.

Edwards hopes the coloring pages will offer something educational and “constructive for kids … other than bringing home another toy or something they don’t need.”

Edwards, who works in digital marketing and photography, said that since there has been such a good response from the community, she has put together a website, rosemonttradingpost.com, “where you can download things like those coloring pages.”

She also created an Instagram page, @rosemonttradingpost, to showcase items left there. “I’m hoping to inspire people to come on down,” she said. ◆