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DRESSED FOR SALK-cess! Institute's first Halloween-themed open house

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies reported that its fifth open house, Explore Salk, drew a record 2,102 visitors to the world-renown research campus in La Jolla on Saturday, Oct. 27. The free event featured hands-on experiments and virtual-reality stations hosted by Salk’s Education Outreach program and the San Diego Children’s Discovery Museum Mobile Exhibit.

For the first time, there was also trick-or-treating. The first few hundred costumed attendees received bags for collecting the Halloween candy placed at all the science stations. (Unfortunately, the bags, and the candy, ran out within an hour of the 10 a.m. start.)

Explore Salk was previously held in April. This year, it was decided to use the event to celebrate the Oct. 28 birthdate of Salk Institute founder Jonas Salk (1914-1995). Since Salk’s birthday falls so close to Halloween, Institute staff asked all kiddos to arrive in costume — preferably as their favorite scientist.

Xavier Kelso, 5, and his sister Sophia, 10 — students at St. Martin of Tours Academy — came as Dr. Jonas Salk and Rachel Carson, author of the book ‘Silent Spring.’
Xavier Kelso, 5, and his sister Sophia, 10 — students at St. Martin of Tours Academy — came as Dr. Jonas Salk and Rachel Carson, author of the book ‘Silent Spring.’ COREY LEVITAN
Henry Jiang, 10, pays tribute to the name sake of his school, Marie Curie Elementary, as ‘a male Marie Curie.’ The bag contains green slime Jiang claims is radioactive.
Henry Jiang, 10, pays tribute to the name sake of his school, Marie Curie Elementary, as ‘a male Marie Curie.’ The bag contains green slime Jiang claims is radioactive. COREY LEVITAN
Alice Alola, 8, and her brother Max, 10 — students at Albert Einstein Academy — arrive as Marie Curie and Dr. Jonas Salk.
Alice Alola, 8, and her brother Max, 10 — students at Albert Einstein Academy — arrive as Marie Curie and Dr. Jonas Salk. COREY LEVITAN
Ava Farmer, 7, of Carmel Valley dresses up as a scientist the easy way.
Ava Farmer, 7, of Carmel Valley dresses up as a scientist the easy way. COREY LEVITAN
La Jolla resident Kingston Johnson, 3, prefers zombies to scientists.
La Jolla resident Kingston Johnson, 3, prefers zombies to scientists. COREY LEVITAN
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