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Good Glossary To Gain: La Jolla Community Planning Terms, July 2019

Good Glossary To Gain: La Jolla Community Planning Terms

Good Glossary To Gain: La Jolla Community Planning Terms

(La Jolla Light)

You’ve no doubt seen La Jolla Light’s Alphabet Soup list of community planning groups, their missions and meeting times, which is published periodically and updated at lajollalight.com/news/sd-cm-ljl-alphabet-soup-20190717-story.html

And if your goal is to get more involved in these groups (but you sometimes get lost in their lingo), here’s a glossary of common planning terms to help:

Applicant: Any person who has filed an application for a permit, map or other matter, and who is the record owner of the real property that is the subject of the permit, map or other matter; the record owner’s authorized agent; or any other person who can demonstrate a legal right, interest or entitlement to the use of the real property subject to the application.

Applicant’s representative: Any authorized person speaking for the applicant, such as an architect designing the subject development.

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Brown Act: California’s Open Meeting Law under which all Community Planners Committees must comply to ensure the actions and deliberations of public bodies occur openly with public access and input.

Building envelope: The three-dimensional space within which a structure could be located as established by the applicable setbacks and maximum allowable structure height.

Coastal Development Permit: Required for all development of a premises within the Coastal Overlay Zone, for all coastal development on a project site located completely within the Coastal Commission Permit Jurisdiction or in the Deferred Certification Area.

Consent Agenda: A board meeting practice that groups routine business and reports into one agenda item. The consent agenda can be approved in one action without discussion, rather than filing motions on each item separately.

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Council Policy 600-24: The standard operating procedures and responsibilities for recognized community planning groups. The policy is to identify responsibilities and to establish minimum operating procedures governing the conduct of community planning groups when they operate in their official capacity.

Discretionary approval: Approval or denial by a City Decision Maker after public notice and/or public hearing.

Final review: A presentation at which time a vote to recommend approval or denial of a project is expected.

Findings: Determinations based upon a statement or set of statements of factual evidence that are used as the criteria for making a decision on a discretionary action.

Floor Area Ratio (FAR): The numerical value obtained by dividing the gross floor area of all buildings on a premises by the total area of the premises on which the buildings are located.

Ministerial approval: Administrative decisions by City staff — building permits, right-of-way permits, etc.

Non-agenda public comment: An opportunity to speak on topics that are not otherwise listed on the agenda.

Phantom Floor: Located within the space above or below actual floors within a building, and measured separately above each actual floor or below the lowest actual floor for under floor area.

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Preliminary review: An initial review of a project, at which time a vote is not expected. However, the Committee may, by a unanimous vote, proceed to consider a vote of recommendation on a project presented for Preliminary Review.

Processes: Applications for permits, maps, and other approvals are reviewed through one of the five decision processes (see below).

Process 1: A project for which City staff conducts the review and issues a decision to approve or deny, with no Community Planning Group review required.

Process 2: A project for which City staff conducts the review and issues a decision to approve or deny. At this process level, public notice is required when applications are submitted (and some subsequent stages) to all property owners, tenants, community planning groups within 300 feet of the development and anyone requesting notice.

Process 3: A project for which a review is conducted by City staff, with a final decision by a hearing officer. At this process level, public notice is required when applications are submitted (and some subsequent stages) to all property owners, tenants, community planning groups within 300 feet of the development and anyone requesting notice.

Process 4: A project for which a review is conducted by City staff, followed by a San Diego Planning Commission hearing and decision. At this process level, public notice is required when applications are submitted (and some subsequent stages) to all property owners, tenants, community planning groups within 300 feet of the development and anyone requesting notice.

Process 5: A project for which a review is conducted by City staff, followed by a San Diego Planning Commission recommendation hearing and then a City Council hearing and decision. At this process level, public notice is required when applications are submitted (and some subsequent stages) to all property owners, tenants, community planning groups within 300 feet of the development and anyone requesting notice.

Pulling: Removing an item from the consent agenda and requesting a full presentation of that item. Any member of the public can “pull” an item in advance of a meeting, or at the meeting itself, for any reason.

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Site Development Permit: Required where environmentally sensitive lands are present … to apply site-specific conditions as necessary to assure that the development does not adversely affect the applicable land-use plan and to help ensure that all regulations are met.

SOURCES: San Diego Municipal Code, Article 3, Division 1 titled “definitions”; City of San Diego information page “Types of Discretionary Permits/Approvals”; City of San Diego’s Development Services “Project Submittal Requirements”; City of San Diego Development Review Process.


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