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Opinion

Our Readers Write: La Jollans share their views about scooters, park restrooms, other local matters

A flood of electric scooters by private companies continues to be placed daily on sidewalks and public areas throughout La Jolla and the San Diego region, despite growing public outcry.

A flood of electric scooters by private companies continues to be placed daily on sidewalks and public areas throughout La Jolla and the San Diego region, despite growing public outcry.

(K.C. Alfred / San Diego Union-Tribune)

Opinion / Letters to the Editor / Our Readers Write:

The following are Letters to the Editor from recent issues of La Jolla Light as La Jollans speak out on local issues. Letters published in La Jolla Light express views from readers in regard to community matters. To share your thoughts in this public forum, e-mail them with your name and city of residence to editor@lajollalight.com or mail them to La Jolla Light Editor, 565 Pearl St., Suite 300, La Jolla, CA 92037. Submissions of related photos are also welcome. Letters reflect the writers’ opinions and not necessarily those of the newspaper staff or publisher.

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Why start Scripps Park bathroom project in the middle of summer?

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I was just given the La Jolla Light story (read it at bit.ly/covepavilion) by a City official from the February meeting about the La Jolla Cove Pavilion bathroom project, I had been inquiring as to why in the heck the City would close and fence-off the dilapidated, disgusting, yet usable Cove bathrooms at the beginning of August, and I have yet to hear the right answer. As of my trip to The Cove last week, no one had even broken ground on the project!

At the very least, someone should also have put in some kind of temporary tap shower, water hose, whatever, for those of us who exit the sea and don’t want to get into our cars all crusty and sandy. It’s really a slap in the face to all the long-distance swimmers who use The Cove to swim across to marked buoys or Scripps Pier.

So, this project is going to take two years to complete? Why? I’ve seen whole houses put up in 90 days; this should not take more than 6-9 months. Several years ago, both the Children’s Pool and La Jolla Cove lifeguard towers were closed for over two summer seasons while we awaited their new and improved versions. It wasn’t right and the La Jolla Rough Water swim was canceled during that time because of it.

Take a close look at the La Jolla Cove tower; it isn’t wearing too well, either.

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John Gastaldo

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My broken fibula is due to scooter scat

The scooters are blocking many sidewalks here in La Jolla and they are a major hazard for pedestrians. On Sunday, Aug. 4 around 8:30 p.m., I tripped on a scooter laying on its side on the northeast corner of Kline Street and Eads Avenue. I was walking south, heading home from watching the sunset at the beach west of the Contemporary Art Museum. I was in extreme pain and was lucky enough to have a friend stop and help me into his truck and drive me home.

My ankle and foot were very swollen, so I iced them all night and was able to get into my doctor’s office around 8 on Monday, Aug. 5. He confirmed a broken fibula and ligament damage. He then put a fiberglass cast on my ankle and I am now on crutches and in pain.

I can’t go in the ocean, walk anywhere, drive anywhere — or even take a shower. There are too many scooters!

Doug Moranville

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Bottom line: No defense for the proliferation of electric scooters

The pro-scooter letter by “K.G.” in the Aug. 15 La Jolla Light (read it at bit.ly/lettersaug15) was quite misleading and sounds like it comes from a politician receiving donations from scooter companies. Bringing up e-wheelchairs, already in use by the elderly, has nothing in common with scooters. Reducing gas auto pollution, again, is unrelated, as scooters are used for entertainment purposes and those who use them still drive to our beach areas in cars and then take scooters to play on, endangering all others.

Comparing biking to school as “a danger” today also does not make scooters safe. To promote health and safety, tourists can rent a bike from local businesses at $15/half day or $20/full day, thereby helping local merchants as opposed to out-of-town corporations.

Furthermore, saying bike- and pedestrian-friendly European countries have wide sidewalks so people will avoid driving is still no reason to have scooters; scooters are still going 15 mph along the boardwalk where the speed limit is 8 mph, and going to bars and using scooters after dark is still causing injuries and deaths.

I’m no longer safe riding my bike on the boardwalk or other beach/bay areas because of the young people speeding and weaving on scooters. The City has passed laws to help this problem, but I see little change, as there is no or little enforcement. Abandoned scooters are still blocking sidewalks all over town.

I am proud to use my name on this letter, not just my initials, as the previous letter writer (scooter company rep?) did.

Jack Resnick

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Scooters don’t belong on crowded city streets

I think the scooters are useless for city streets ... maybe on a college campus. My idea is to rent them through kiosks around San Diego, but there needs to be accountability and monitoring of their use.

Not wearing helmets is an accident waiting to happen. Two people on a scooter? Children on scooters as passengers? Others going 45 mph down to La Jolla Cove?

Who is monitoring all this? Enforcement seems to be worthless. I have seen scooters parked in the corrals, but not after they’re rented. How much money was paid to local governments for the scooter contracts? I would rather see electric car rentals. These scooters are invading our communities and jeopardizing the safety of citizens. The disaster is already happening.

Karen Marshall

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Late-night La Jolla? No thanks!

There is a less-than-rosy side to the idea of La Jolla night life. Ask any resident of Torrey Pines Road how they would enjoy late-night heavy traffic. It’s bad enough at high noon. Never mind “high” nights.

Robyn Willsey Morton

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La Jolla Cove Swim is a brand-new event

I write to provide clarification that there is no connection between a new The La Jolla Cove Swim and previous swims, including the La Jolla Rough Water Swim. La Jolla Parks and Beaches, Inc. is pleased with Judy Halter’s leadership of this new event that nods to the tradition of swims at The Cove, but is not associated with any predecessors. Judy has designed the Swim and related events, which are different from previous swims, and we are hopeful that funds will be generated for our beloved Scripps Park and junior swimmers. Thank you for publishing this clarification. More information at thelajollacoveswim.org

Ann Parode Dynes

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Lack of loveliness languishing in La Jolla

I am absolutely disappointed over the infrastructure situation in the Village of La Jolla. It is such world tourist town, but it no longer has clean beauty. La Jolla was once a charming place with great shops and restaurants. Recently, I visited because I had not been in the area for months ... but it has not changed at all. The sidewalks are coming apart and look trashy. The garbage cans are awful and most of the times are overflowing with trash. The park at The Cove looks like it hasn’t had any makeover for quite a while. The grass is scarce and almost dying.

La Jollans, you need to form a Beautification Committee and walk the streets of The Village to truly understand the disappointment I’m expressing at the state of things. I don’t even bring my relatives here anymore; it’s embarrassing.

Marta Den

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Just love a good Dr. Seuss myth!

I recently read the La Jolla Light article (read it at bit.ly/loraxtree) about the Dr. Seuss “Lorax tree” falling down from a few months ago. I lived in La Jolla from age 5 in 1970 until moving to San Francisco (where I live now) in 1990. I support your supposition that it’s an urban myth that the Scripps Park trees inspired Dr. Seuss.

As a kindergarten through 12th grade kid in La Jolla in the ‘70s and early ‘80s, if that were a supposed Seuss tree, I’d have heard about it. I went to The Evans School when it was on Westbourne Street, just uphill from the 7-Eleven that is still there on La Jolla Boulevard.

The school was so small that we’d often bus to Scripps Park for phys-ed class. We’d play games right in the shade of that tree. The word Seuss was never uttered by any kid or adult.

However, here’s a good myth for you! Among the kids, the word was that, supposedly, if you hiked up to Seuss’ house on Halloween he’d give you a full-sized Hershey bar! Mind-blowing at the time! But that was just rumor. Never confirmed by anyone.

Christopher Baker

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Correction

Pertaining to the letter in the Aug. 8, 2019 La Jolla Light issue, “Was report on building signs/murals one-sided?” the La Jolla Community Planning Association’s motion included the Marco Polo auto-service shop “mural” as one that is a billboard and needs to be regulated under the La Jolla Planned District Ordinance.

And while the Branding Iron silk-screening business shares a space with the Marco Polo mural, it is considered a separate business and was therefore not included in the motion.

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What’s on YOUR mind?

Letters published in La Jolla Light express views from readers in regard to community issues. To share your thoughts in this public forum, e-mail them with your name and city of residence to editor@lajollalight.com or mail them to La Jolla Light Editor, 565 Pearl St., Suite 300, La Jolla, CA 92037. Letters reflect the writers’ opinions and not necessarily those of the newspaper staff or publisher.


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