Toastmasters Today: La Jolla group speaks up for confident presentations

Ray Yomtob gives a speech during the table topics portion of the Toastmasters of La Jolla meeting, which moderator Prabhu Kandasamy watches.
Ray Yomtob gives a speech during the table topics portion of the Toastmasters of La Jolla meeting, which moderator Prabhu Kandasamy watches.

By Ashley Mackin

In modern society, why talk when you can text? Why explain in person when you can e-mail?

Not surprisingly, public speaking is listed as the No. 1 fear in the country. But it needn’t be, insist members of Toastmasters of La Jolla.

Aimed at improving the lost art of in-person communication, Toastmasters of La Jolla is an organization with meetings that provide opportunities for public speaking in a supportive environment.

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Ray Yomtob gives a speech during the table topics portion of the Toastmasters of La Jolla meeting, which moderator Prabhu Kandasamy watches.

“While social media is great for global outreach, it can create a disconnect because people rely on it so heavily that they don’t have those relationships that are built in person,” said Melanie Klinghoffer, a Toastmasters of La Jolla member. “Social media diminishes people’s ability to communicate one-on-one (or in front of others), and there is room for miscommunication when messages are on a screen; people are left to perceive things on their own without the opportunity to clear up any misunderstanding, which you get when talking to someone in person.”

Toastmasters’ weekly meetings are divided into segments that each serve to improve a specific communication skill.

There are different roles members can sign up for to help the meetings run smoothly, and each task requires some speaking. There is a Timer, who monitors how long people speak and later reports who stayed within the time constraint. There is a Grammarian, who tracks each speaker’s “ums” and “uhs,” not in a critical sense, but to help speakers become aware of how often they use the interjections. There are also Main Speakers, who write a speech in advance and present it to the group. At a recent meeting of some 25 attendees, the main speaker was local sculptor Mark Adams, who gave his first main speech that evening.

“Over the last few years, my career has taken off and I found myself in front of a lot of people to be interviewed. I realized my speaking skills were not great and I had a lot of nervous energy,” he said. “One of the things that helped me improve on that was getting feedback at these meetings. I never get feedback when I’m in front of people. Here you have people who see things that I don’t see. One comment was that when I talk, I look down when I think, which I had no idea I did.”

Though he still gets nervous from time to time, Adams said he can now control it, and he felt good going into his Toastmasters speech.

“Everybody here is extremely supportive, it’s almost like a sports team. You don’t feel awkward making mistakes. You understand everybody makes mistakes, but nobody judges you. It’s a great group.”

In addition to the Main Speaker, there is a Table Topics session, where a question is posed and attendees are asked at random to come up and answer it.

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Toastmasters of La Jolla President Linh Nguyen explains table topics.

Questions at one meeting included, “What is the nicest thing you’ve ever done for someone else?” and “If you could live anywhere for two years, where would it be and why?” The questions and Table Topics leader change weekly. After each person speaks, the membership applauds to show support.

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