Postal Service: We strictly adhere to rules for sale of historic properties

For more than two years, the Save Our La Jolla Post Office Task Force has been working to assure the U.S. Postal Service does not sell the historic post office building at 1140 Wall St.
For more than two years, the Save Our La Jolla Post Office Task Force has been working to assure the U.S. Postal Service does not sell the historic post office building at 1140 Wall St.

As news organizations have reported, the U.S. Postal Service is in a financial crisis that necessitates the passage of comprehensive postal reform legislation to return the organization to sound financial footing now and for the future.

Meanwhile, the vast majority of the steps the Postal Service has taken to reduce operating costs over the past several years have been transparent to our customers. Mail delivery performance remains strong, and we’ve enhanced our products and services, including package-tracking capabilities.

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For more than two years, the Save Our La Jolla Post Office Task Force has been working to assure the U.S. Postal Service does not sell the historic post office building at 1140 Wall St.

In regards to your March 25, article titled “La Jolla preservationist testifies at hearing on post office sales,” one initiative that has gained attention is our efforts to sell some Post Office buildings with historic significance. Why would we do this?

Property disposals are one of the tools the Postal Service has traditionally used to increase revenue and decrease costs. Each facility’s size, location, costs and revenue, and the operations housed there, are taken into account. If the facility is too large for our needs and too costly to maintain, we need to sell it, even if it is an historic property.

When it comes to these actions, it is important to know that the Postal Service strictly adheres to all federal laws, rules and regulations pertaining to the sales of historic properties.

What’s more, the federally appointed Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) was recently asked to submit a report to Congress on how the ACHP can ensure that the Postal Service complies with the National Historic Preservation Act. The Postal Service has met with the ACHP and provided documents to assist them. We appreciate their efforts to ensure the process remains strong, and we invite them to discuss with Postal Service leadership in Washington, D.C., any issues raised during the development of their report.

All of our stakeholders can be assured that the Postal Service, the roots of which date back to 1775, respects and values the rich history of this nation, which is why we carry out effective preservation efforts in buildings that we continue to own.

We also ensure that these historic buildings are in better condition because of the covenants and easements that are in place for the future when we decide to relinquish ownership. In some instances, purchasers of historic postal facilities engage in preservation efforts that exceed those previously undertaken by the Postal Service.

Tom Samra

Facilities Vice President

U.S. Postal ServiceWashington, D.C

Let’s work to instate  30-day rule for rentals

For a growing number of La Jolla residents (and anyone of us could be next), it is getting harder to enjoy our own homes. The source of this misery is the exploding Short-term Vacation Rental (STVR) business, an industry that is actively selling and managing homes in our residential neighborhoods for substantial profit. In our small community, nearly 500 homes are currently being advertised nation-wide for short-term rentals. Despite the industry’s bucolic claims of happy, peaceful temporary neighbors, the reality more often is strangers who aren’t aware of the needs of permanent residents to sleep at night or use their homes undisturbed during the day.

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