La Jolla Town Council moves forward with new and returning officers

City Councilwoman Sherri Lightner leads La Jolla Town Council officers in taking the oath (from left): Board President Cindy Greatrex, Treasurer Yolanda de Riquer, Secretary Sonia Marie Olivas, First Vice-President Steve Haskins and Second Vice-President Peter Wulff. Pat Sherman
City Councilwoman Sherri Lightner leads La Jolla Town Council officers in taking the oath (from left): Board President Cindy Greatrex, Treasurer Yolanda de Riquer, Secretary Sonia Marie Olivas, First Vice-President Steve Haskins and Second Vice-President Peter Wulff. Pat Sherman
photo
City Councilwoman Sherri Lightner leads La Jolla Town Council officers in taking the oath (from left): Board President Cindy Greatrex, Treasurer Yolanda de Riquer, Secretary Sonia Marie Olivas, First Vice-President Steve Haskins and Second Vice-President Peter Wulff.    Pat Sherman

By Pat Sherman

Despite recent discord among its executive committee, the La Jolla Town Council’s board of trustees appeared to be back on track Sept. 13, during the organization’s regular monthly meeting.

District 1 City Councilwoman Sherri Lightner administered the oath of office to returning executive committee members Cindy Greatrex (president) and Sonia Marie Olivas (secretary), as well as to new executive committee members Steve Haskins (first vice-president), Peter Wulff (second vice-president) and Yolanda de Riquer (treasurer).

Greatrex and Olivas, who resigned from their posts last month, were reinstated after the disagreement was hashed out at a Sept. 4 special meeting, which led to the resignation of Ken King as former first vice-president and the censure of immediate past president Rick Wildman.

Children’s Pool lifeguard tower

During last week’s meeting, Lighnter also offered an update on several La Jolla projects, including replacement of the lifeguard tower at Children’s Pool.

Stronghold Engineering was awarded a contract to design and build the project, for which 90 percent of the design is complete.

A representative from Lightner’s office said the city must obtain an “Incidental Seal Harassment Permit” from the National Marine and Fishery Services (NMFS) before it can demolish the tower.

The city’s environmental consultant is working to obtain an exemption from NMFS. If the exemption is granted, demolition would likely be completed by November. If it is not and a permit is required, demolition will occur after the seal pupping season (Dec. 15-May 15).

Construction of the new tower will begin next summer and take approximately 220 days. Work will cease during the 2013-2014 pupping season, and resume in summer 2014.

Torrey Pines Road Corridor Project

Work on Segment 4 of the Torrey Pines Road Corridor Project — the first scheduled piece of the $26.5 million undertaking, spanning from Little Street to La Jolla Shores Drive — will not begin until the end of 2013, Lightner said.

Thus far, $1.2 million of Segment 4 has been funded, with an additional $4 million still needed to complete the work. So far, the city has spent $280,000 on the preliminary design of Segment 4, Lightner said.

“We have about $1 million we’re going to

use right now to move forward on certain things that the community actually requested,” such as moving light posts and other obstacles from sidewalks on the north side of Torrey Pines Road, from Prospect Place to La Jolla Shores Drive, and making curbs compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Lightner said.

The first installment of Segment 4 also includes installation of a new sidewalk between Calle Juela and Roseland Drive on the south side of Torrey Pines Road.

Remaining improvements in Segment 4 include work on the median, bike lanes, drainage, lighting and landscaping; installation of new fencing on the north (ocean) side of Torrey Pines Road; and reconfiguration of traffic lane widths. A diagram of the proposed work can be viewed at

http://www.sandiego.gov/engineering-cip/projectsprograms/pdf/tprconceptplanmap.pdf

Several storm water diversion projects along Torrey Pines Road also are planned for the near future. “When we get a timeline, we’ll be sure to share it,” Lightner said. “They (city officials) do have some concerns about whether they will require an environmental document or not, and we’re hoping not.”

Page:
   
-

Comments

Be relevant, respectful, honest, discreet and responsible. Commenting Rules