Category archives for: Editorial Columns

Encountering the ’70s

Inga

You never hear the term anymore, but when my former husband and I first moved here in the 1970s, encounter groups were in full swing. For those who may have arrived in Southern California later, encounter groups were generally weekend or week-long unstructured group meetings of eight to 12 people plus a leader/facilitator with the alleged intent of increasing emotional expressiveness and communication, and promoting personal growth.

The Great Morgani leaves the sidewalk

Inga

It would probably surprise many people who know me (or then, maybe it wouldn’t) that one of the highlights of my life was waltzing to the Dr. Zhivago movie’s “Lara’s Theme” with a homeless guy on the sidewalk in downtown Santa Cruz serenaded by a space-alien-costumed accordion player named The Great Morgani. The homeless guy had asked me to dance and it would have been rude to decline. Plus, the opportunity to embarrass your two college-age sons? Oh, yeah.

Research Report: Satellite data reveals the rapid darkening of the Arctic

Forty-five years after scientists hypothesized that global warming would make Arctic Ocean surfaces darker, Scripps team determines how much the planet’s albedo has diminished

The Cane Mutiny: Pushing sugar to the sidelines (Part 1)

Catharine L. Kaufman

Considered one of the most energy-depleting foods, studies have shown sugar to be as addicting as cocaine, and linked to causing serious dental, mental and physical diseases and ailments. Sugar is a modern gustatory obsession mistakenly used to reward children for good behavior, a celebratory treat, a love token and a customary way to end a meal.

When science is fiction

Inga

Both my husband and I enjoy reading science fiction although Olof’s preferred focus is outer space while mine involves beauty and weight loss articles in women’s magazines, which are especially bountiful this time of year. I love this stuff. The sheer creativity! The total illogic! The charming lunacy! All of the advice in these magazines is, of course, attributed vaguely to “science,” “research,” or “experts.”

Almond joy: Nutty aphrodisiac for Valentine’s Day

Catharine L. Kaufman

Tying first place on the A-(phrodisiac) List, knocking the lowly oyster (loaded with mercury, cadmium and PCB’s) out of the running, and neck-and- neck with bittersweet chocolate is the divine, heart-healthy, nutrient-dense almond. Here are this beaut’s sexy little secrets to help revv up your sweetie’s engine for Valentine’s Day and always.

A grim fairy tale

Inga

I was recently reading a fairy tale to my tiny grandchildren …..

There’s more cookin’ than the food

Inga

My husband is having an emotional affair. There, I’ve said it. Actually, if we’re being perfectly honest, it’s THREE emotional affairs and they’re all with cooking show honeys. I will refer to them as the Southern Sweetie, the Pioneer Person, and the Italian Temptress.

Science meets food: Salk’s gustatory experiment

Catharine L. Kaufman

A holistic medical pioneer in ancient Greece nearly 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates prescribed that food be used as medicine since it was the most powerful healing agent against diseases. That philosophy is embraced by the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, which recently launched a wellness series.

Kitchen Shrink: When moo shu meets matzo: Horsing around Chinese New Year 2014

Catharine L. Kaufman

Strolling through the cookbook aisles of my local bookseller searching for something fun and creative for the Chinese New Year, two titles caught my eye: “From Lokshen to Lo Mein — the Jewish Love Affair with Chinese Food” by Donald Siegel and “The New Chinese Kosher Cookbook” by Ruth and Bob Grossman. These are likely combinations since Jewish and Chinese cuisines (and cultures) share many similarities, despite the presence of shrimp and pork in Chinese dishes that violate kashrut laws.

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