Category archives for: Kitchen Shrink

Go gaga over spring foods

Catharine L. Kaufman

Spring is when Mother Nature throws a coming out party for her animals, minerals and vegetables. The supermarket produce aisles are brimming with a bounty of delicate shoots, beans, peas and fresh herbs, while the meat department is filled with young, tender cuts of carnivorous offerings. Inquisitive column folk want to know spring’s best contributions. Here are your answers.

Eat healthy and prosper: National Nutrition Month, Part II

Catharine L. Kaufman

While 50 million people a day in this country scarf down on fast food, a swelling industry with yearly revenues ka-chinging to the tune of $110 billion a year, it’s time to clean up our acts in honor of March’s National Nutrition Month. Here are a few more snippets of gustatory advice to ease into a lifestyle of healthy habits.

While 50 million people a day in this country scarf down on fast food, a swelling industry with yearly revenues ka-chinging to the tune of $110 billion a year, it’s time to clean up our acts in honor of March’s National Nutrition Month. Here are a few more snippets of gustatory advice to ease into a lifestyle of healthy habits.

Eat healthy and prosper: National Nutrition Month, Part 1

Catharine L. Kaufman

According to the World Factbook, as of 2008, 33 percent of the adult American population is considered to be obese (calculated by Body Mass Index of 30 or greater). A poor diet leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, assorted cancers, diabetes, infertility, and alas, snoring. As March brings in a mentality of rejuvenation across the land it is fittingly time to pay homage to National Nutrition Month.

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we salute the cabbage!

Catharine L. Kaufman

A century ago cabbage was sneered at as a peasant’s food. Today, it is lauded as a nutritional powerhouse with anti-cancerous and anti-aging agents:

The Cane Mutiny: Pushing sugar to the sidelines (Part 1)

Catharine L. Kaufman

Considered one of the most energy-depleting foods, studies have shown sugar to be as addicting as cocaine, and linked to causing serious dental, mental and physical diseases and ailments. Sugar is a modern gustatory obsession mistakenly used to reward children for good behavior, a celebratory treat, a love token and a customary way to end a meal.

Almond joy: Nutty aphrodisiac for Valentine’s Day

Catharine L. Kaufman

Tying first place on the A-(phrodisiac) List, knocking the lowly oyster (loaded with mercury, cadmium and PCB’s) out of the running, and neck-and- neck with bittersweet chocolate is the divine, heart-healthy, nutrient-dense almond. Here are this beaut’s sexy little secrets to help revv up your sweetie’s engine for Valentine’s Day and always.

Science meets food: Salk’s gustatory experiment

Catharine L. Kaufman

A holistic medical pioneer in ancient Greece nearly 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates prescribed that food be used as medicine since it was the most powerful healing agent against diseases. That philosophy is embraced by the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, which recently launched a wellness series.

Kitchen Shrink: When moo shu meets matzo: Horsing around Chinese New Year 2014

Catharine L. Kaufman

Strolling through the cookbook aisles of my local bookseller searching for something fun and creative for the Chinese New Year, two titles caught my eye: “From Lokshen to Lo Mein — the Jewish Love Affair with Chinese Food” by Donald Siegel and “The New Chinese Kosher Cookbook” by Ruth and Bob Grossman. These are likely combinations since Jewish and Chinese cuisines (and cultures) share many similarities, despite the presence of shrimp and pork in Chinese dishes that violate kashrut laws.

Comforting cabbage rolls have international history

Catharine L. Kaufman

Stuffed cabbage rolls, a blend of sweet, sour and savory flavors, are popping up everywhere from diners and delis to five-star restaurants. They are the new mac-and-cheese, but comfort food with a healthful twist, warming the cockles of your heart, while warding off heart disease. Many countries lay claim to its origins, which accounts for the several interesting riffs on the traditional recipe.

Catch some zzz’s with these sleepy bites

Catharine L. Kaufman

Living in a stress-filled electromagnetic soup has created a nation of insomniacs. According to the Centers for Disease Control, between 50 and 70 million American adults suffer from sleep disorders. If you’re among them, conider making the new year the time to muffle the static in your head, ease tense muscles, trigger sleep hormones (serotonin and melatonin) to flow freely and get your long overdue beauty sleep. Let’s toss the sleeping pills and indulge in soporific foods. Pleasant dreams.

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