The Redskin Ruckus and other culinary controversies

If you’re not a sports fanatic, you probably haven’t heard the recent hoopla over the National Football League team called the Washington Redskins. The media is in an uproar (come on, after all these years) over the allegedly disparaging name that is considered a politically incorrect slur against Native Americans. The solution is a simple one. Make the team’s mascot a redskin potato. Which brings us to the food community with a slew of insulting innuendos of its own.  Some of these will really give you something to beef about.

Catharine L. Kaufman

Let’s start with the redskin potato (the skin hue is really closer to pink, rosé or magenta), which is on an even playing field with the Washington Redskins. Isn’t this lowly spud also the victim of an offensive nomenclature? In addition, there is absolutely no allegiance to Native American cuisine, as the main carbohydrate of choice is maize or corn.

Then there’s red onions, red grapes, red beets, red wine and red caviar giving them an unfair tie-in with Communism and the Red Scare. While blueberries, blue cheese and blue corn might be insensitive to those suffering from depression, and bananas can refer to other psychological problems.

Green Giant brand food, along with jumbo sea scallops and extra large eggs, could be viewed as insulting to tall or large folks, while shrimp, baby (carrots, spinach, corn, cucumber, and broccoli), miniature squashes, Brussels sprouts and munchkin pumpkins could be seen as offensive to the little people. Let’s not forget about Tom Thumb or baby redskin potatoes, which are a double affront.

String beans, shoestring potatoes, thin mints and thin spaghetti have a negative connotation for skinny people, while Ugli fruit pokes fun at the physically unattractive. We’re talking age discrimination with Granny Smith apples, old cheeses (particularly Parmesan and cheddar), preserved and pickled vegetables along with vintage wines and other gracefully aging alcoholic drinks.

Finally, tender young peas, spring chickens, extra virgin olive oil, honey, sugar, cheesecake and hot tamales are possibly caught in the crosshairs of sexual harassment.

You get the picture. Now, back to those redskins (potatoes, not players, of course). Of the more than 5,000 varieties of potatoes, the redskins make up the lion’s share. The thin-skinned, white waxy fleshed, robust flavored spuds range from small to medium-sized and round to oval-shaped, including the Ida Rose, French Fingerling, Pink Pearl, Red Pontiac, Lady Rosetta and Ruby Crescent. These versatile tubers of Peruvian origin can be roasted, fried, baked, boiled, blended in soups or stews, or made into a potato salad as they hold their shape well after cooking. They absorb aromatic flavors, complimenting both comfort foods and exotic dishes, and are equally as scrumptious served hot or cold.

This low fat, high carb powerhouse is rife with vitamins and minerals, along with a goodly amount of protein. They are especially loaded with stress-busting B6’s, immune-boosting Vitamin C, bone and blood’s ally, Vitamin K, riboflavin and folate. There’s more. Redskins are a good source of copper and potassium for dialing up energy, with smaller amounts of magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc and selenium.

Winning Redskin Smashed Spuds

Ingredients

3 pounds of redskin potatoes, (baby creamers, Ida Reds, your choice)

1 1/2 cups of half-and-half cream or whole milk (adjust to desired consistency)

1/4 pound or 1 stick of unsalted butter

1/2 cup of Greek yoghurt (unflavored)

3 garlic cloves, minced

Sea salt and cracked black pepper to taste

2 scallions, thinly sliced (for garnish)

Method: Scrub potatoes, and place unpeeled in a large saucepan or stockpot, with enough water to cover, and a sprinkling of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered for about 20 to 25 minutes or until tender to a fork. Drain and return to the pot. Mash with a hand masher, a ricer or an electric mixer using a paddle attachment. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, heat the butter on low and sauté the garlic until tender. Add the cream (or milk) and heat through. Blend into the potatoes. Gently fold in the yoghurt, and season with salt and pepper. Garnish with chopped scallions (optional). Enjoy immediately.

–For additional redskin recipes, email kitchenshrink@san.rr.com

Related posts:

  1. Gustatory gifts for the graduate
  2. It’s time to quarterback a winning Super Bowl soiree
  3. Chino Farms hosting Alice Waters book signing
  4. I’m cruising the grocery aisles with my culinary wish list of exotic ingredients
  5. Pantry Purging: It’s time to spring-clean your kitchen

Short URL: http://www.lajollalight.com/?p=116643

Posted by Staff on Nov 12, 2013. Filed under Columns, Editorial Columns, Kitchen Shrink. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

Leave a Reply

La Jolla Community Calendar

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

RSS North Coastal News

  • Del Mar Thoroughbred Club releases statement concerning turf course July 27, 2014
    “Del Mar is deeply saddened by the loss of Thoroughbred lives we have experienced at the track since the start of our season. Four of those losses have come on our new turf course. Despite that, we continue to have the utmost confidence in the course, as do our partners in this race meet — the Thoroughbred Owners of California, the California Thoroughbred Tr […]
  • Carmel Valley Library to host piano trio in concert July 27, 2014
    The 45-minute program will include music by Debussy, Schubert, and Dvorak. […]
  • Del Mar residents back from Sports Chalet trip July 27, 2014
    The grand prize included round-trip airfare for two to Kahului Airport, accommodations at the Lumeria Maui, and tickets to OluKai’s annual Ho’olaulea’a concert. […]