St. Patrick’s Day ‘tradition’ observed with 33rd open reading at D.G. Wills in La Jolla

At La Jolla’s D.G. Wills Books, St. Patrick’s day is more than an observance: It’s a tradition.

The smell of baked potatoes, the burn of whiskey on the tongue, the voices of legendary poets hanging in the air – this is Saint Patrick’s Day at D.G. Wills Books at  7461 Girard Ave. in La Jolla.

One of the greatest holiday traditions in La Jolla will be renewed this Saturday, March 17, as the bookstore celebrates its 33rd Annual Reading of Irish Poetry and Prose. Each year, proprietor Dennis Wills welcomes the public into his store to read selections from legendary Irish writers the likes of James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie, Wills Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Edmund Burke, Sean O’Casey, etc. from 7 P.M. “until it ends.”

Come to share or just indulge while enjoying some of the more beloved food and drink in Irish culture.

Members of the public can step to the microphone and read any piece of Irish writing. The only rule at the microphone is that the material must be related to Ireland and should last no longer than five to seven minutes.

Some readers choose to stray from the traditional heavyweights. Wills said some people choose to simply tell an Irish joke and are done in 30 seconds. One regular at the event recites the complete “Win One for the Gipper” speech by Knute Rockne, head coach of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. Sometimes small groups will act out scenes from plays by Beckett or O’Casey or will perform Irish music. Live bands have performed.

In addition to the speakers, Wills also traditionally plays a tape recording of Joyce reading “Finnegan’s Wake” and of Yeats reading some of his poetry.

“Once it gets going, there is a chemistry and an electricity in the air,” Wills said, “just from hearing James Joyce’s voice. And Yeats, he sounds like a mystic when he reads.”

“Some people will come every year for some years, then they’ll stay away, then show up again two years later,” Wills said. “That’s okay. But if you show up, you have to have a drink.”

Irish food and drink are usually available in abundance, including corned beef and baked potatoes that Wills likes to eat the old-fashioned way, with his bare hands.

“And there may be a few drops of Irish whiskey,” Wills said.

Not surprisingly, the tone of the event tends to shift as the evening wears on. Wills typically breaks the readings into three sets with short intermissions between, and the third set is when Wills steals the show by reading some of Joyce’s “x-rated” love letters to his wife.

“That’s after the polite people in the audience who might be offended have gone home for the evening,” Wills said. “After we’re a little lubricated it’s fun to read the graphic letters to his wife.”

Wills is fond of saying that the proceedings are officiated by Messrs. Guiness and Harp, in reference to the beers that are practically Ireland’s national beverages.

For more information call 858-456-1800, or visit www.dgwillsbooks.com.


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Posted by Dave Schwab on Mar 12, 2012. Filed under Featured Story, La Jolla, News, Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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