Scripps researchers discover brain cell malfunction in schizophrenics

Scripps Research Associate Professor Elizabeth Thomas

Findings could point to new therapies

Scientists at La Jolla-based Scripps Research Institute have discovered that DNA stays too tightly wound in some brain cells of schizophrenic subjects.

The findings suggest that drugs already in development for other diseases might offer hope as a treatment for schizophrenia and related conditions in the elderly.

The research, now available online in the new Nature journal, Translational Psychiatry, shows the deficit is especially pronounced in younger people, meaning treatment might be most effective early on at minimizing or even reversing symptoms of schizophrenia.

“We’re excited by the findings,” said Scripps Research Associate Professor Elizabeth Thomas, a neuroscientist who led the study. “There’s a tie to other drug development work, which could mean a faster track to clinical trials to exploit what we’ve found.”

During the past few years, researchers have recognized that cellular-level changes not tied to genetic defects play important roles in causing disease. There is a range of such so-called epigenetic effects that change the way DNA functions without changing a person’s DNA code.

One critical area of epigenetic research is tied to histones. These are the structural proteins that DNA has to wrap around.

“There’s so much DNA in each cell of your body that it could never fit in your cells unless it was tightly and efficiently packed,” said Thomas. Histone “tails” regularly undergo chemical modifications to either relax the DNA or repack it. When histones are acetylated, portions of DNA are exposed so that the genes can be used. The histone-DNA complexes, known as chromatin, are constantly relaxing and condensing to expose different genes, so there is no single right or wrong configuration. But the balance can shift in ways that can cause or exacerbate disease.

DNA is the guide that cellular machinery uses to construct the countless proteins essential to life. If portions of that guide remain closed when they shouldn’t because histones are not acetylated properly, then genes can be effectively turned off when they shouldn’t be with any number of detrimental effects. Numerous research groups have found that altered acetylation may be a key factor in other conditions, from neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease to drug addiction.

Thomas had been studying the roles of histone acetylation in Huntington’s disease and began to wonder whether similar mechanisms of gene regulation might also be important in schizophrenia. In both diseases, past research in the Thomas lab had shown that certain genes in sufferers were much less active than in healthy people.

“It occurred to me that we see the same gene alterations, so I thought, ‘Hey, let’s just try it,’” she said.

Working with lead author Bin Tang, a postdoctoral fellow in her lab, and Brian Dean, an Australian colleague at the University of Melbourne, Thomas obtained post-mortem brain samples from schizophrenic and healthy brains held at medical ”Brain Banks” in the United States and Australia. The brains come from either patients who themselves agreed to donate some or all of their bodies for scientific research after death, or from patients whose families agreed to such donations.

For more information on the research, click here.

–Staff Reports

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Posted by Pat Sherman on Dec 28, 2011. Filed under Health & Science, La Jolla. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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